Bangabandhu-1 Liftoff on Revamped SpaceX Falcon 9: Gallery

Liftoff of Bangabandhu-1 geostationary
communications satellite
for
nation of
Bangladesh
on 1st new
and improved Block 5 version of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018 at
4:14 p.m. EDT from
Launch
Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida – as seen from the
pad perimeter.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
Ken Kremer 
  
SpaceUpClose.com     27 May 2018



KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,
FL –  Earlier this month Bangabandhu-1 lifted off on the first flight of SpaceX’s
heavily revamped Block 5 version of the firms commercial Falcon 9 rocket from the
Florida Space Coast on May 11.





This new and improved
model of the Falcon 9 will also soon launch US astronauts back to space and the
International Space Station from US soil. 





The upgraded 23 story
tall Falcon 9 lifted off right on time at 4:14 p.m. EDT
(2014 GMT) from historic Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy
Space Center in Florida.

Beautiful blastoff of Bangabandhu-1
geostationary communications satellite
for nation of Bangladesh on 1st
new and improved Block 5 version of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018
at 4:14 p.m. EDT from
Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida – as seen
from the pad crawlerway.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Enjoy our eyewitness
SpaceUpClose.com photo and video gallery of the Falcon 9 boosters launch from America’s
Premier Spaceport!

This marked the 9th
SpaceX launch of 2018- doubling last years launch pace
This story and
imagery are belatedly online here due to my need to NASA’s eastern Virginia shore
launch base at Wallops Island to see the then upcoming launch of the Orbital
ATK Antares rocket carrying the Cygnus cargo freighter on the OA-9 resupply mission
for NASA to the International Space Station (ISS). 
Liftoff of Bangabandhu-1 geostationary
communications satellite
on
1st upgraded  Block 5 version
of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018 at 4:14 p.m. EDT from
Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s
Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida – as seen from the pad perimeter.
Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
The 229 foot tall (70 meter) Falcon 9 soared
off seaside pad 39A into brilliant blue skies mixed in with wispy clouds that
afforded an absolutely gorgeous sky show for spectators gathered from across
the globe to witness the spectacle.

Liftoff of Bangabandhu-1 geostationary
communications satellite
on
1st upgraded  Block 5 version
of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018 at 4:14 p.m. EDT from
Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s
Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida – as seen from the pad perimeter.
Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
Bangabandhu-1 is the 1st
ever geostationary communications satellite for the nation of Bangladesh.


Bangabandhu-1
blastoff May 11, 2018
from pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in
Florida.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com


The Bangabandhu-1
geosatcom will greatly improve internet and TV connectivity in Bangladesh and
benefit peoples lives across Asia – especially in rural areas. 

Beautiful blastoff of Bangabandhu-1
geostationary communications satellite
for nation of Bangladesh on 1st
new and improved Block 5 version of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018
at 4:14 p.m. EDT from
Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida – as
seen from the KSC press site.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

The two stage Falcon 9 liftoff off roared off
pad 39 after all 9 Merlin 1D engines igniting to generate about 1.95 million
pounds of liftoff thrust- roughly 8 percent higher than the prior Block 4
version of the booster. 
Liftoff of Bangabandhu-1 comsat on 1st upgraded  Block 5 SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018
at 4:14 p.m. EDT from pad 3
9A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
Liftoff of Bangabandhu-1 comsat on 1st upgraded  Block 5 SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on May 11, 2018
at 4:14 p.m. EDT from pad 3
9A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com


Some eight minutes
after successfully launching Bangabandhu-1 on May 11 the first stage
accomplished a precision guided soft landing onto the deck of the drone ship
named ‘Of Course I Still Love You’ or OCISLY for short, by reigniting a subset
of the 9 Merlin 1D first stage engines. 

Watch our ear-splittingly
loud Up-Close launch video:

Video Caption: Launch of 1st upgraded Block 5
SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket
on May 11, 2018 from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, delivering
Bangabandhu-1 comsat to geostationary orbit
– as seen in this remote camera
video taken at the pad. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com


Read out accompanying
booster arrival story.
SpaceX next Falcon 9
launch from the Florida Spaceport is scheduled for May 31, 2018 at 12:29 a.m.
EDT carrying the SES-12 comsat to geostationary transfer orbit.
SpaceX Falcon 9
streaks skyward delivering Bangabandhu-1 comsat to geostationary orbit
on May 11, 2018 from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space
Center, FL.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX,
ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Orbital ATK and more
space and mission
reports direct from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station,
Florida and Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia.
Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing
Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news: www.kenkremer.com –www.spaceupclose.com –
twitter @ken_kremer – email:
ken
at kenkremer.com




Photos
for sale – contact Ken if interested



Bangabandhu-1
blastoff May 11, 2018
from pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in
Florida.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Bangabandhu-1
blastoff May 11, 2018
from pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in
Florida.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
Bangabandhu-1
blastoff May 11, 2018
from pad39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in
Florida.
Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Ken Kremer

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics. Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events.

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