Poor Weather Scrubs SpaceX Cargo Delivery Launch to Space Station to July 25: Watch Live/Photos

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for lift off and
vents LOX at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in
Florida for the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to
the International Space Station until poor weather scrub on July 24, 2019.
Launch is rescheduled for 6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. View from VAB roof at NASA’s
Kennedy Space Center.  Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com 
Ken
Kremer —
SpaceUpClose.com &
RocketSTEM
– 24 July 2019
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL    Day
long threats of poor weather from anvil clouds, thunderstorms and lightning put
an end to hopes to launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 on a cargo delivery run for NASA
to the International Space Station as the countdown clock clicked relentlessly down
to T-Zero – until a scrub was finally called as expected in the final moments
before the hoped for liftoff this evening July 24. 



The SpaceX launch team decided to give it a
try despite the continuing poor weather forecast all day.



The scrub was called out with a ‘Hold, Hold,
Hold’ from the launch team at T Minus 30 seconds Wednesday evening, July 24
before the planned liftoff of the SpaceX Falcon 9 at 6:24 PM ET (2224 GMT) with the
Dragon CRS-18 cargo ship
from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in
Florida – bound for the ISS.



“The launch of SpaceX’s 18th Commercial
Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station – scheduled for
this evening – has scrubbed due to unfavorable weather conditions,” said NASA.

The SpaceX Falcon 9 launch is now scheduled for Thursday, July
25, at 6:01 p.m. EDT  

(2201 GMT).

You can watch the launch live on NASA TV or SpaceX website



Launch coverage will begin at 5:45 p.m. on NASA
TV
and the agency’s website



A launch on Thursday would result in the Dragon
spacecraft arriving to the space station Saturday, July 27,” said NASA. 



Check out our gallery
of Space UpClose eyewitness photos captured at the launch pad on Cape Canaveral
Air Force and the Kennedy Space Center – from the roof of the Vehicle Assembly
Building (VAB) and around the Launch Complex 39 Press Site.


SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for lift off and
vents LOX at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in
Florida for the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to
the International Space Station until poor weather scrub on July 24, 2019.
Launch is rescheduled for 6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. View from VAB roof at NASA’s
Kennedy Space Center.  Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

The launch
window is ‘instantaneous’ meaning any delay for weather or technical reason forces
a minimum 1 day scrub – as happened today. 



Unfortunately the weather outlook remains poor
for Thursday with only a 30% chance of acceptable conditions.



Meteorologists with the U.S. Air Force 45th
Space Wing predict only a 40% chance of favorable weather for the SpaceX  Dragon launch on July 25. 



The primary weather concerns are cumulus
clouds and their associated anvil clouds, as well as lightning.



After Thursday the next liftoff opportunity
is around Aug. 1, SpaceX said at the prelaunch briefing for media at the KSC Press
Site.  
SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands poised for lift off at Cape
Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida for the
company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the
International Space Station – in this up close view from pad 40. After poor weather
scrub July 24, 2019, launch is rescheduled for 6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. Credit:
Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

The goal of the CRS-18 mission is cargo delivery
for NASA with some three tons of science and supplies to the
International Space Station (ISS) from the Florida Space Coast.

Among the cargo will be a very important docking
adapter known as
International Docking Adapter-3 (IDA-3),
which is required to be on station in order for the new commercial
crew spaceships from SpaceX and Boeing to dock at the orbiting outpost. 
SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for lift off and
vents LOX at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in
Florida for the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to
the International Space Station until poor weather scrub on July 24, 2019.
Launch is rescheduled for 6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. View from VAB roof at NASA’s
Kennedy Space Center.  Credit: Ken
Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands poised for lift off at Cape
Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida for the
company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the
International Space Station – in this up close view from pad 40. After poor weather
scrub July 24, 2019, launch is rescheduled for 6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. Credit:
Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com 

Also aboard is the Techshot 3D BioFabricationl Facility (BFF) – the first ever 3D printer
capable of manufacturing human tissue in orbit. 

1st experiments will focus
on printing human cardiac cells. This 500 lb unit was on display at the
KSC press site – see our photo. 
Techshot BFF. Credit:
Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
The CRS-18
mission features a once flown Falcon 9 Block 5 version rocket that launched in
May 2019 on the CRS-17 resupply mission -also from pad 40.

The Dragon is also recycled and marks the first time that
SpaceX will use a Dragon for the third time.

This Dragon CRS-18 Dragon cargo ship previously launched in
April 2015 on CRS-6 and December 2017 on CRS-13.

The two stage Falcon 9/Dragon rocket stands
about 213-feet (65-meters) tall.

The weather outlook is not good. Meteorologists
with the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing predict only a 30% chance of favorable
weather for the SpaceX  Dragon launch on
July 25.

The primary weather concerns are cumulus
clouds and their associated anvil clouds, as well as lightning.

The 20-foot
high, 12-foot-diameter
Dragon CRS-16 vessel is jam packed with more than 5000 pounds (2300 kilograms) of science
experiments, research hardware, space parts, food water, clothing and more supplies
for the six person Expedition 60 crew.

The research gear will support dozens of the
more than 250 science and
research
investigations that will occur during Expeditions 60 and
beyond. 
UpClose view of Dragon CRS-18 cargo freighter atop SpaceX Falcon
9 rocket poised for lift off at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch
Complex 40 in Florida for the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services
(CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station – in this up close view
from pad 40. After poor weather scrub July 24, 2019, launch is rescheduled for
6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com 
UpClose view of SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket recycled 1st
stage poised for lift off at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch
Complex 40 in Florida for the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services
(CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station – in this up close view
from pad 40. After poor weather scrub July 24, 2019, launch is rescheduled for
6:01 p.m. EDT, July 25. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com 


Furthermore 
Dragon’s unpressurized trunk is carrying the Boeing-built International
Docking Adapter-3 (IDA-3)
to orbit.  

IDA-3 fills up most of the truck and has a mass
of 1177 pounds (534 kg).
Astronauts will use the stations Canadian-built robotic
arm to pluck IDA-3 from the trunk and install it onto the
space-facing
zenith port of the station’s Harmony module.
IDA-3 will become the second docking adapter for
the astronaut carrying commercial crew vehicles –joining IDA-2 – thereby allowing
both the Boeing Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon to simultaneously dock at the
ISS and offering vast advantages and expanding opportunities to NASA to overlap
commercial crew missions – much like is currently possible for Russian Soyuz
capsules.
IDA-3 replaces
IDA-1 which was lost when a prior SpaceX Dragon was lost during a Falcon-9 launch
failure in 2015 of the CRS-7 mission. 
IDA-2 arrived
in 2016 and was used successfully for the first time for the docking of the
SpaceX Demo-1
Commercial Crew
Program
t
est flight in March 2019.
“Dragon will dock to the space station Friday,
July 26, and be greeted by NASA astronauts Nick Hague,
Christina Koch
and Andrew Morgan.
Using the station’s robotic arm, Hague will grab, or grapple, Dragon with Koch
providing backup. Morgan will assist by monitoring telemetry during Dragon’s
approach. After Dragon capture, mission control in Houston will send ground
commands for the station’s robotic arm to rotate and install it on the bottom
of the station’s Harmony module,” according to NASA.



SpaceX was awarded an
approximately $3.1 Billion contract from NASA to launch 20 Dragon cargo missions
to the orbiting outpost through 2019 under the Commercial Resupply Services-1
(CRS-1) agreement that was amended in 2015 and increased from an original value
of $1.6 Billion.  
Three missions
remain: CRS-18, CRS-19 and CRS-20.
NASA also awarded a CRS
contract to Northrop Grumman that has likewise been increased.

Both companies also won new cargo mission contracts under
the Commercial Resupply Services-2
(CRS-2) agreement awarded last year. 


Watch my commentary about the SpaceX launch of  NASA cargo including the IDA-3 docking adapter
at Fox 35 TV News at the 3rd video of this link:
Dr Ken Kremer/Space UpClose July 24, 2019 interview with Fox
35 Orlando TV News about the SpaceX CRS-18 mission to the ISS

Ken will be onsite at the Kennedy Space Center and
Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for live reporting of the SpaceX CRS-18
mission launch.

SpaceX CRS-18 prelaunch briefing. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com 

Watch for Ken’s
continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin,
Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from the Kennedy
Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida and Wallops Flight
Facility, Virginia.



Stay tuned here for
Ken’s continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news: www.kenkremer.com –www.spaceupclose.com – twitter
@ken_kremer – email: ken at kenkremer.com



Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the
KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about
space topics.

………….

Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events



Ken’s upcoming outreach events:


Jul 26: Quality Inn Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, FL, evenings.  Learn more about the upcoming/recent
NASA Orion Ascent-2 Abort test 
Falcon Heavy, NASA 2024 Moon landing
goal, SpaceX Starlink-1,
SpaceX Falcon 9/CRS-17
launch to ISS, SpaceX Demo-1 launch/test failure, SpaceX Beresheet
launch, NASA missions, ULA Atlas & Delta launches,
Northrop Grumman Antares, SpySats and more
 


Ken will display his photos for sale


Ken Kremer

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics. Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events.

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