SpaceX Duo of Payload Fairings Caught by Boats from Korean Satellite Launch Return to Port Canaveral: Video/Photos

SpaceX Payload Fairings Caught by Boats from Korean Satellite Launch Return to Port Canaveral: Video/Photos
One of dual mid-air caught payload fairing halves from same nose cone hoisted at 8:45 a.m. ET July 22, 2020 off SpaceX GO Ms.Tree ship and placed onto cradled transporter just hours after overnight arrival into Port Canaveral. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL.  Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

For SpaceUpClose.com & RocketSTEM

PORT CANAVERAL, FL –  The first ever dual payload fairings  halves caught by SpaceX boats from the same launched nose cone – originating from Mondays Falcon 9 rocket launch of South Korea’s first dedicated military satellite July 20 – returned to Port Canaveral overnight in darkness and were subsequently hoisted off mere hours later this morning Wednesday, July 22, onto cradled transporters after daylight dawned and driven away in rapid succession – presumably for eventual reuse.

The dynamic duo of caught fairings arrived back in Port Canaveral this morning July 22, a day and a half after they launched the South Korean Anasis 2 military communications satellite encapsulated inside aboard a flight-proven SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at 5:30 p.m. EDT (2130 GMT) Monday, July 20 from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

Although somewhat scorched as expected from their high speed whirlwind trip to space and back while enduring extreme high temperatures both fairings appeared to be fully intact – as the spectacular scene unfolded this morning of a duo of mid-air caught nose cone halves were craned off the highly maneuverable, fast moving and uniquely designed SpaceX twin fairing catching ships named GO Ms. Tree and GO Ms. Chief.

UpClose view of mid-air caught payload fairing half hoisted off SpaceX GO Ms.Tree ship at 8:45 a.m. ET July 22, 2020 and placed onto cradled transporter just hours after overnight arrival into Port Canaveral. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

And there were NO longer any protective blue tarps covering the fairings or obscuring the view – as they had been removed after the overnight Port arrival to allow the crane crews unfettered and safe access.

All aboard for the Fairing Express Train! 1st Time SpaceX catches both payload fairing halves mid-air from the same nose cone – and intact to boot! Lined up 1 by 1 in a row after hoisting onto horizontal cradled transport vehicles for shipping back to Cape processing facilities – with rigging net for catches coincidentally hoisted vertical by crane. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

The first fairing half was hoisted off GO Ms. Chief by the crane crew around 815 a.m.

The second half of the Anasis-II nose cone was similarly hoisted off GO Ms. Tree starting at 8:45 a.m. and gently lowered horizontally onto the cradled transport vehicles – as I observed first hand from across the Port Canaveral channel.

Birdseye view look inside! Aboard the Fairing Express Train! 1st Time SpaceX catches both payload fairing halves mid-air from the same nose cone – and intact. Lined up end to end horizontal atop cradled transporters and looking inside during depart to Cape processing facilities. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Enjoy our Space UpClose photo gallery taken this morning, July 22, of SpaceX’s stunning fairing recovery achievement following return to Port Canaveral.

UpClose view of mid-air caught payload fairing half hoisted off SpaceX GO Ms.Tree ship at 8:45 a.m. ET July 22, 2020 and placed onto cradled transporter just hours after overnight arrival into Port Canaveral. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

And then less than an hour later it was time for ‘All aboard the Fairing Train Express’  as workers got in gear and drove to line up the fairing carrying vehicles 1 by 1 in a row caravan style.

All aboard for the Fairing Express Train! 1st Time SpaceX catches both payload fairing halves mid-air from the same nose cone – and intact to boot! Lined up 1 by 1 in a row after hoisting onto horizontal cradled transport vehicles for shipping back to Cape processing facilities. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

At one point the caught nose cone halves were picturesquely parked beside a rigging net used for the mid-air catches that was coincidentally hoisted vertical by crane – making for quite see herein.

Then both vehicles departed in such a way angled side by side horizontally I was able to simultaneously look directly inside the fairing halves for an exquisite view to see the acoustic and insulation padding lining the interior of each fairing from the bottom to the top of each nose cone

Birdseye view look inside! 1st Time SpaceX catches both payload fairing halves mid-air from the same nose cone – and intact. Lined up horizontal atop cradled transporters and looking inside during depart to Cape processing facilities. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Before daylight both ships had sailed into Port Canaveral and berthed along North Cargo Pier 6 where the SpaceX fleet normally docks when recovered boosters return on droneships.

Prior to the Anasis-II launch the pair of ships had been deployed from Port Canaveral and prepositioned some 480 miles (775 kilometers) east of Cape Canaveral in the Atlantic Ocean.

Crane workers attached hoisting cables to recovered payload fairing caught mid-air by Go Ms. Tree boat and returned to Port Canaveral July 22. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

What was once considered amazing science fiction is now confirmed science fact – and incredible to witness first hand from my technical background as a science researcher.

UpClose view of mid-air caught payload fairing half hoisted off SpaceX GO Ms.Tree ship at 8:45 a.m. ET July 22, 2020 and placed onto cradled transporter just hours after overnight arrival into Port Canaveral. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

This was the second successful launch and landing for this particular Falcon 9 first stage booster B1058.2 – which by the way had flown once previously on the history making flight that successfully launched the Demo-2 crew of two NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station (ISS) on May 30 from Florida.

By the way Demo-2 was the first launch of humans from US soil in almost 9 years!

Taking the long view as flight-proven SpaceX Falcon 9 soars to orbit carrying Anasis-II at 530 p.m. July 20, 2020 for South Korean military -see logo ! on 2nd flight – in this remote camera view. 1st Falcon 9 flight flew first 2 NASA astronauts Bob Behnken & Doug Hurley to International Space Station in 9 years from US soil on historic Demo-2 mission on May 30, 2020. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

Watch these fairing catch videos of both nose cone halves released by SpaceX:

Previously SpaceX had only been able to catch one fairing on three different occasions.

Long view look directly inside SpaceX payload fairing caught by Go Ms Tree boat from Anasis-II mission after return to Port Canaveral on July 22, 2020 and Falcon 9 launch on July 20. From Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

The launch of the Anasis-II national security military communications satellite to geostationary orbit for South Korea will enable its use to help with defense needs on the Korean peninsula and the ever present threats from North Korea under the leadership of Kim Jong Un.

The satellite was built by Airbus as part of an offset package between Lockheed Martin and the South Korean government as an exchange for the purchase of 40 F-35 combat aircraft jets back in 2014.

From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

SpaceX payload fairing caught by GO Ms Chief siting in cradle atop transport vehicle after return to Port Canaveral on July 22, 2020 and Falcon 9 Anasis-II launch on July 20 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

My commentary about the Anasis-II mission was featured on WESH 2 NBC TV New Orlando on July 20 and 21 along with my prelaunch photos as well as WFTV ABC TV News Orlando on July 20 and 21

Ken Kremer of Space UpClose offers commentary about the Anasis-II mission on WESH 2 NBC TV News Orlando on July 20 and 21, 2020

My launch and prelaunch photos were featured at Spaceflight Now

https://spaceflightnow.com/2020/07/20/spacex-delivers-south-koreas-first-military-satellite-into-on-target-orbit/

Watch Ken’s continuing reports about Commercial Crew and Artemis and more onsite for live reporting of upcoming and recent SpaceX and ULA launches including Demo-2, Starlink, X-37B, Solar Orbiter, Mars 2020 and more at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news: www.kenkremer.com –www.spaceupclose.com – twitter @ken_kremer – email: ken at kenkremer.com

Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics.
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Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events

SpaceX catches both payload fairing halves mid-air and intact from the same nose cone. Lined up tip to tip after hoisting onto horizontal cradled transport vehicles for shipping back to Cape processing facilities. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

One of dual mid-air caught payload fairing halves from same nose cone hoisted at 8:45 a.m. ET July 22, 2020 off SpaceX GO Ms.Tree ship and placed onto cradled transporter just hours after overnight arrival into Port Canaveral. From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
From Falcon 9 lift off carrying Anasis-II for the South Korean military on July 20, 2020 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

 

SpaceX payload fairing caught by GO Ms Chief siting in cradle atop transport vehicle after return to Port Canaveral on July 22, 2020 and Falcon 9 Anasis-II launch on July 20 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

SpaceX payload fairing caught by GO Ms Chief siting in cradle atop transport vehicle after return to Port Canaveral on July 22, 2020 and Falcon 9 Anasis-II launch on July 20 from Space Launch Complex-40 on Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, FL. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

 

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Ken Kremer

Ken Kremer

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics. Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events.

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