Recovered Nose Cone from 5x Flown Falcon 9 Booster Arrives Intact at Port Canaveral for SpaceX Dramatic Day of Action: Photos

Recovered Nose Cone from 5x Flown Falcon 9 Booster Arrives Intact at Port Canaveral for SpaceX Dramatic Day of Action: Photos
Pelican trio soars over recovered intact payload fairing half being hoisted off Go Ms. Chief fairing catcher as recovered 5x launched/landed Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch berths at Port Canaveral north pier atop the OCISLY droneship on Aug. 10, 2020. All from launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

For SpaceUpClose.com & RocketSTEM

PORT CANAVERAL, FL –  In another remarkable space hardware recycling feat the SpaceX team managed to recover both nose cone halves as well as the Falcon 9 1st stage from the now 5x flown and landed booster following Fridays beautiful post-midnight blastoff of the 10th batch of their Starlink broadband internet satellites to orbit on Aug. 7 from the Sunshine State.

Both payload fairing halves and the booster all arrived triumphantly intact back into Port Canaveral on Saturday, Aug. 8 and Monday, Aug. 10, respectively – thereby setting up a ‘Dramatic Day of Action’ by SpaceX involving simultaneous payload fairing and 1st stage processing and hoisting by multiple SpaceX work crews and making for a space spectacular in full public view in the channel waters of Port Canaveral.

Up Close view of recovered intact payload fairing half being hoisted off Go Ms. Tree fairing catcher as recovered 5x launched/landed Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch berths at Port Canaveral north pier atop the OCISLY droneship on Aug. 10, 2020. All from launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Following liftoff both fairings had to be scooped out from the corrosive Atlantic Ocean waters by the special catcher ships Go Ms. Tree  and Go Ms. Chief – using their secondary nets.  Both boats are outfitted with primary nets resembling a catchers mitt and held outstretched on 4 giant telescoping booms.

Up Close look inside recovered intact payload fairing as crew inspects after hoisting off Go Ms. Tree fairing catcher ship on Aug. 10, 2020. After 5x recycled Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch berths nearby at Port Canaveral north pier atop the OCISLY droneship. All from launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

The nose cone halves were not caught mid-air this time, unlike last time, after making a parachute assisted guided splashdown some 40 minutes after launching soon after midnight Friday from Launch Complex- 39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center.

Fairing & Fowl In Flight ! Man-made recovered intact payload fairing half hoisted off GO Ms. Chief fairing catcher as nature-made pelican flies by. After 5x recycled Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch berths at Port Canaveral north pier atop the OCISLY droneship on Aug. 10, 2020. All from launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Go Ms. Tree  and Go Ms. Chief sailed into Port Canaveral on Sat., Aug. 8 and docked side by side at the the north cargo pier 6. However no work to hoist them off was conducted over the weekend – partially due to poor weather.

Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief firing catcher ships with recovered intact payload fairings covered in blue tarps from Starlink launch on Aug. 7, 2020 from KSC sailed into Port Canaveral on Sat., Aug. 8 and docked side by side at north cargo pier 6. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Furthermore one of the fairing boats also had to undock and move to another spot to make way for arrival of a giant cargo ship on Sunday – as well as for OCISLY on Monday with the recovered Falcon 9 booster on deck.

Recovered intact payload fairing half hoisted off Go Ms. Chief fairing catcher as recovered 5x launched/landed Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch berths at Port Canaveral north pier atop the OCISLY droneship on Aug. 10, 2020. All from launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Finally Monday morning Aug. 10 began with the gloriously colorful Space Coast sunrise arrival of the 5x recycled SpaceX Falcon 9 1st stage booster atop the veteran OCISLY droneship into Port Canaveral barely 3 days after Fridays beautiful blastoff.

Both recovered intact payload fairings are lined up in a caravan on transport trucks after hoisting off Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief fairing catcher ships on Aug. 10, 2020 at Port Canaveral. From Starlink launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

But the entire Monday morning was wonderfully action packed with virtually the entire SpaceX fleet of ships in motion to simultaneously handle the offloading of both nose cone halves from their fairing catcher boats that also over the weekend.

 

After OCOSLY docked at the normal berthing spot of North Cargo Pier 6 the crane crews focus shifted to the fairings

Dramatic Day of Action with virtually the entire SpaceX fleet of ships in motion as 5x launched/landed Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch arrives atop OCISLY droneship towed by tug Finn Falgout to berthing port as fairing catcher ships Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief also maneuver in channel to sequentially off load both recovered nose cone halves with hoisting cranes on Aug. 10, 2020. From 10th Starlink launch Aug. 7 2020 LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Both fairing catchers Go Ms Tree  and Go Ms Chief had to be docked and undocked sequentially at he same docking pier due to the now very limited berthing space at the North Cargo pier caused by the giant cargo ship.

 

It doesn’t get much better for space enthusiasts than seeing this space feast of  3 huge and major pieces of recovered space hardware from the same mission being carefully and methodically maneuvered in front of your eyes  – and realizing they will almost certainly be re-flown on a future flight in the not too distant future from the Florida Space Coast

 

Enjoy our Space UpClose photo gallery focusing on the payload fairing hoisting’s.

Check back as the gallery grows.

Be sure to check out our separate story and gallery dealing with the 1st stage booster arrival.

 

The mission began with the nighttime liftoff of the oft delayed 10th SpaceX Starlink mission took place at last Friday, August 7 at 1:12 a.m. EDT, 512 GMT from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at Kennedy Space Center in Florida – heading on a trajectory northeast.

Fisheye Launch Streak Shot: 10th batch of SpaceX Starlink broadband internet satellites streak to orbit after multiple delays from Launch Complex 39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida, in this fisheye view under beautiful and somewhat hazy conditions overnight at 1:12 a.m. ET Aug. 7 2020. Spectacular sky show includes stage separation near top of arc in this long duration single image streak shot from turn basin at KSC Press Site. Moon upper right, pad 39B left of center, pad 41 right of center where Mars Perseverance rover launched July 30, and Pegasus barge dock left where SLS component LVSA just arrived this week. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Overall the Starlink constellation could eventually number over 12,000 satellites.

SpaceX plans to launch 1 or 2 Starlink missions per month for the foreseeable future.

The goal according to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is to provide cost competitive internet services around the globe – especially for remote and underserved areas

Initial beta test service in North America is expected later this year.

The pricing information for the Starlink service or terminal has not been announced.

Musk has said previously that the pizza-sized receiver dishes will be simple to operate – basically just point to the sky.

 

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has made rocket recycling a top priority in order to slash launch costs.

 

Musk says that the fairings cost approximately $6 million or roughly 10% of the approximate cost of $60 million for a new Falcon 9 rocket.

Dramatic Day of Action with virtually the entire SpaceX fleet of ships in motion as 5x launched/landed Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch arrives atop OCISLY droneship towed by tug Finn Falgout to berthing port as fairing catcher ships Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief also maneuver in channel to sequentially off load both recovered nose cone halves with hoisting cranes on Aug. 10, 2020. From 10th Starlink launch Aug. 7 2020 LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Overall this counts as the 90th flight of a Falcon 9 rocket since 2010 and the 13th Falcon 9 launch of 2020.

Top down look at recovered payload fairing moved inside processing hangar at Port Canaveral after hoisted off fairing boats on Aug. 10, 2020. From 10th Starlink launch Aug. 7 2020 LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

To date SpaceX has recovered the Falcon 9 first stage booster 57 times by land and by sea.

Watch my Aug 3 interview at ‘Stay Curious’ show American Space Museum about successful Mars Perseverance launch, successful splashdown SpaceX Crew Dragon on Demo-2 1st commercial mission, Artemis Moon mission and more:

Watch my commentary about the 1st SpaceX Starlink launch attempt for this mission at WFTV ABC 9 Orlando TV News on Jun 25

https://www.wftv.com/news/local/brevard-county/spacex-launch-another-round-starlink-satellites-friday/4WKS5J4QDBA7TJ2E4SPI5UJQRI/

Watch Ken’s continuing reports about Commercial Crew and Artemis and onsite for live reporting of upcoming and recent SpaceX and ULA launches including Demo-2, Starlink, X-37B, Solar Orbiter, Mars 2020 and more at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news: www.kenkremer.com –www.spaceupclose.com – twitter @ken_kremer – email: ken at kenkremer.com

Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics.
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Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events

Up Close look inside recovered intact payload fairing as crew inspects after hoisting off Go Ms. Tree fairing catcher ship on Aug. 10, 2020. After 5x recycled Falcon 9 1st stage from SpaceX 10th Starlink launch berths nearby at Port Canaveral north pier atop the OCISLY droneship. All from launch Aug. 7, 2020, LC-39A on NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

 

Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief firing catcher ships with recovered intact payload fairings covered in blue tarps from Starlink launch on Aug. 7, 2020 from KSC sailed into Port Canaveral on Sat., Aug. 8 and docked side by side at north cargo pier 6. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief fairing catcher ships with recovered intact payload fairings covered in blue tarps from Starlink launch on Aug. 7, 2020 from KSC sailed into Port Canaveral on Sat., Aug. 8 and docked side by side at north cargo pier 6. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com
Go Ms. Tree and Go Ms. Chief fairing catcher ships with recovered intact payload fairings covered in blue tarps from Starlink launch on Aug. 7, 2020 from KSC sailed into Port Canaveral on Sat., Aug. 8 and docked side by side at north cargo pier 6. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

 

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Ken Kremer

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics. Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events.

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