Landing Legs Raised on SpaceX Crew-3 Landed Falcon 9 Booster after Port Canaveral Arrival: Photos

Landing Legs Raised on SpaceX Crew-3 Landed Falcon 9 Booster after Port Canaveral Arrival: Photos
Right side landing leg raised by crane crew on SpaceX Falcon9 booster B1067 atop ASOG droneship on Nov. 15, 2021 with hoisting cap attached and Pelican recon overhead after Port Canaveral arrival at north cargo pier on Sunday evening, Nov. 14. It had landed atop ASOG droneship after launch on Nov. 10. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

For SpaceUpClose.com & RocketSTEM

PORT CANAVERAL/KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL –  All four deployed landing legs have been raised on the ‘flight-proven’ SpaceX Falcon 9 booster by late Monday evening, Nov. 15, just over 24 hours after it had returned back to Port Canaveral, Florida, Sunday evening, Nov. 14, for a rare and positively stunning nighttime arrival, following its launch of the NASA ESA quartet of Crew-3 multinational astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) on a spectacular Wednesday evening Nov. 10 liftoff and landing eight minutes later on a company droneship.

After Sunday night’s Port Canaveral arrival and completely securing ASOG with the Falcon 9 booster at the normal location North Cargo pier 6 location the ship crews appeared to rest for a while.

UpClose view crane crews at work raising right side landing leg first at base of SpaceX Falcon 9 on Monday, Nov. 15, 2021 on recovered 1st stage booster B1067 atop ASOG droneship after arrival into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 towed by support ship Doug. Several Merlin 1st stage engines in view. Launched NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

A small but dedicated crowd of lucky spectators, space fans, and space media were thrilled and delighted to witness and cheer on the absolutely magnificent arrival of the recycled Falcon 9 first stage booster designated B1067 into Port Canaveral Sunday evening following the propulsive guided landing upright on the SpaceX’s newest droneship ‘A Shortfall of Gravitas’ (ASOG).

Spectators watch as SpaceX Falcon 9 recovered 1st stage booster B1067 arrived into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 landed atop the ASOG droneship towed by steaming support ship Doug (left) maneuvering for berthing at cargo pier. Liebherr crane for processing and moving Falcon 9 stands at far right – all reflecting in nighttime port waters. The Falcon 9 launched the NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

Processing activities on B1067 1st stage resumed Monday morning, Nov. 15, with the crane crew leading the efforts on deck of ASOG.

Although showing definite signs of sootiness this booster is still relatively clean after flying to space and back for only its second mission.

Crane crews at work raising right side landing leg first at base of SpaceX Falcon 9 on Monday, Nov. 15, 2021 on recovered 1st stage booster B1067 atop ASOG droneship after arrival into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 towed by support ship Doug. Falcon 9 launched NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

The SpaceX crane crews worked on readying the landing legs for raising by attaching the booster & legs hoisting cap first and then working on the mobile octagrabber device holding the booster upright until release from ASOGs landing deck.

The right-side landing leg was raised first by the crane crew team on Monday, Nov. 15 at about 4 p.m. ET

Check out our photos from raising the first leg at right by the Space Up Close team of Ken Kremer and Jean Wright.

The four deployed landing legs were raised one-by-one flush with the booster core starting late Monday afternoon as we witnessed first hand.

Wide view shows crane crews at work raising right side landing leg first at base of SpaceX Falcon 9 on Monday, Nov. 15, 2021 on recovered 1st stage booster B1067 atop ASOG droneship after arrival into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 towed by support ship Doug – seen docked at left. Falcon 9 launched NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

This comparative up close view from Sunday night, Nov. 14, shows all 4 deployed landing legs on deck of ASOG

UpClose view landing legs and Merlin 1st stage engines as SpaceX Falcon 9 recovered 1st stage booster B1067 arrived into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 landed atop the ASOG droneship towed by support ship Doug. Falcon 9 launched NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

All 4 landing legs were raised by late Monday evening.

The left landing leg was raised next later Monday afternoon as seen by media fried Kyle Montgomery

Finally  all the legs were raised and the crane use used the giant German-built Liebherr to hoist Falcon 9 booster off ASOG at about 1:18 a.m. ET overnight Tuesday morning, Nov. 16 – as seen in this NSF fleetcam screenshot.

NSF Fleetcam screenshot. Credit: NSF

Support ship ‘Doug’ was utilized for the first time for booster return operations.

Up Close view shows support ship Doug on Nov. 15 docked at North Cargo pier after if towed recovered 1st stage booster B1067 atop ASOG droneship into Port Canaveral, FL after arrival on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021. ‘Doug’ is named to honor veteran NASA Astronaut Doug Hurley who flew to space on the history making Demo-2 mission last year in May 2020. Falcon 9 launched NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

‘Doug’ is named to honor veteran NASA Astronaut Doug Hurley who flew to space on the history making Demo-2 mission last year in May 2020 – finally resuming US human spaceflight from US soil after a way too long hiatus following the forced shutdown of NASA’s Space Shuttle program after the final mission STS-135 in July 2011.

Doug in action Sunday night towing Falcon 9 B1067 atop ASOP into Port Canaveral:

SpaceX Falcon 9 recovered 1st stage booster B1067 arrived into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 landed atop the ASOG droneship towed by steaming support ship Doug (left) – all reflecting in nighttime port waters. Falcon 9 launched the NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

Be sure to check out our Falcon 9 B1067 ASOG and Doug arrival photos from Nov. 14 from the Space UpClose team of Ken Kremer and Jean Wright.

 

SpaceX Falcon 9 recovered 1st stage booster B1067 arrived into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 landed atop the ASOG droneship towed by steaming support ship Doug (left) maneuvering for berthing at cargo pier – all reflecting in nighttime port waters. The Falcon 9 launched the NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

The 156 foot tall first stage B1067 plus 6 feet for all four deployed landing legs had successfully soft-landed on the ASOG (ASOG) drone ship as planned some eight and a half minutes after liftoff off the coast of the Carolinas – making 86 successful booster landings overall

The Falcon 9 flew on a northeasterly trajectory from pad 39A.

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-3 mission lifted off at 9:03 p.m. EST Wednesday, Nov. 10 (0203 GMT on Nov. 11), on a 22-story tall SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket integrated with the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endurance commercial crew astronaut ferry ship to the orbiting ISS microgravity  research laboratory from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with Crew Dragon Endurance streaks to orbit on NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station after liftoff at 9:03 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021 – in this long duration exposure single image taken with fisheye lens. Multinational crew aboard Crew Dragon are SpaceX Crew-3 astronauts Raja Chari, commander; Tom Marshburn, pilot; and Kayla Barron, mission specialist; along with Matthias Maurer, ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut and mission specialist. Falcon 9 darted in and out of thick clouds before disappearing quickly behind them. Bracketed by VAB (l) & Countdown Clock + water reflecting US/Crew3 flags flagpole (r). Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

The four multinational German and American astronauts on the NASA, ESA Crew-3 mission safely and successfully docked to the International Space Station (ISS) Thursday evening, Nov. 11 gliding into port aboard SpaceX’s commercial Crew Dragon Endeavour spaceship on its inaugural flight – kicking off a half year science mission at the orbiting microgravity research outpost as members of the newly enlarged Expedition 66.

Crew-3 docked at 6:32 p.m. EST (2332 GMT) Thursday, Nov. 11, over 30 minutes ahead of schedule – and less than 24 hours after launching from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

 

 

NASA astronauts Raja Chari, Tom Marshburn, Kayla Barron, and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Matthias Maurer from Germany opened the hatch of their Crew Dragon spacecraft Endurance at 8:25 p.m.

The Crew-3 astronauts are the third crew to fly a full-duration six-month long science mission to the orbiting laboratory on a SpaceX Crew Dragon, the fourth to the station and the 5th human spaceflight overall on a SpaceX Crew Dragon over the past 18 months.

 

NASA SpaceX Crew-3 multinational astronauts (from left) Thomas Marshburn. Raja Chari and Kayla Barron (NASA) and Matthias Maurer (ESA/Germany) pose at media event following their arrival at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida on Oct. 26, 2021. Liftoff set for Nov. 10, 2021 from Launch Complex 39A at KSC. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

 

Ken’s post launch comments about Crew-3 were featured on local ABC, NBC and Fox TV News outlets in Orlando on Nov. 10 & 11:

https://www.wftv.com/news/local/crew-3-set-dock-iss-ahead-schedule/WTWJDQPWPVCKZIRHW6Y7QMNCOY/

https://www.wesh.com/article/crew-3-launch-wednesday/38212223

Ken Kremer of Space UpClose interviewed by WESH 2 NBC News Orlando about Crew-2 and Crew-3 missions

Ken’s prelaunch comments about the Crew-2 & Crew-3 missions were featured on local CBS, NBC and Fox TV News outlets in Orlando:

Nov. 8 & 9 broadcasts on WESH 2 NBC and Fox 35:

https://www.wesh.com/article/crew-2-splashdown-monday/38192367

https://www.fox35orlando.com/video/999350

 

Nov. 5 broadcast on WKMG CBS 6 Orlando TV News:

https://www.clickorlando.com/news/local/2021/11/05/spacex-nasa-weigh-astronaut-rotation-schedule-as-bad-weather-continues-launch-delay/

Ken’s photos of the static fire test were featured on WKMG CBS 6 Orlando TV News

CBS 6 Orlando WKMG features static fire test photos for NASA SpaceX Crew-3 mission taken at 1 a.m. Oct. 28, 2021, ahead of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-3 mission launch Nov 10, 2021 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/spaceupclose.com

Ken is onsite at KSC for the Crew-3 mission launch campaign

Watch Ken’s continuing reports about SpaceX Crew and Cargo Dragons, Artemis, SLS, Orion and NASA missions, Lucy Asteroid mission, Blue Origin and Space Tourism, SpaceX  Starlink, Commercial Crew and Starliner and Crew Dragon and onsite for live reporting of upcoming and recent SpaceX and ULA launches including Crew 1 & 2 & 3, ISS, Solar Orbiter, Mars 2020 Perseverance and Curiosity rovers, NRO spysats and national security missions and more at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news: www.kenkremer.com –www.spaceupclose.com – twitter @ken_kremer – email: ken at kenkremer.com

Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics.
………….
Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events

Please consider supporting Ken’s work by purchasing his photos and/or donating at Patreon:

https://www.patreon.com/kenkremer

 

SpaceX Falcon 9 recovered 1st stage booster B1067 arrived into Port Canaveral, FL on Sunday evening, Nov. 14, 2021 landed atop the ASOG droneship towed past pleasure boats by support ship Doug. Falcon 9 launched NASA ESA Crew-3 mission to the International Space Station from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 10, 2021. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com
NASA SpaceX Falcon 9 and Crew Dragon poised for liftoff on Crew-3 mission at 9:03 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2021 from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida to the International Space Station. Crew 3 astronauts comprise ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Matthias Maurer of Germany, and NASA astronauts Raja Chari, Spacecraft Commander, Tom Marshburn, pilot, and Kayla Barron, mission specialist. Credit: Ken Kremer/kenkremer.com/SpaceUpClose.com

 

 

x

Ken Kremer

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics. Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.