NASA Artemis 1 Moon Rocket and Record Setting SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Duo Simultaneously Vertical at KSC Launch Complex 39 after SLS Scrub: Photos

NASA Artemis 1 Moon Rocket and Record Setting SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Duo Simultaneously Vertical at KSC Launch Complex 39 after SLS Scrub: Photos
Two rockets simultaneously vertical at sister launch pads 39B & A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA SLS for Artemis 1 lunar mission at center and SpaceX Falcon 9 for Starlink commercial internet satellite mission at right plus SpaceX Super Heavy Starship launch tower under construction at far left at pad 39A – as seen on September 10, 2022 from Canaveral National Seashore, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

For SpaceUpClose.com & RocketSTEM

CANAVERAL NATIONAL SEASHORE/KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL – For a brief day in early September a darling rocket duo were standing simultaneously vertical at the sister pads Launch Pads 39B and 39A at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida – namely NASA’s Artemis 1 maiden SLS/Orion Mega Moon rocket and SpaceX’s record-breaking recycled Falcon 9 rocket hosting a payload of Starlink internet satellites.

NASA’s Artemis 1 SLS/Orion lunar test flight rocket remains at pad 39B following a pair of scrubs from launch attempts on Aug. 29 and Sept. 3.

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket integrated with the Orion spacecraft atop Launch Complex 39B, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is seen venting liquid oxygen during 2nd launch attempt of the unpiloted Artemis 1 lunar mission on Sept. 3, 2022 that was ultimately scrubbed due to a hydrogen fuel leak. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

Meanwhile SpaceX engineers rolled the reused Falcon 9 to pad 39A on Friday, Sept. 9, and raised it vertical on Saturday, Sept. 10, amidst ongoing construction work on the mammoth Super Heavy/Starship tower which just grew higher with 8th segment just added.

Two rockets simultaneously vertical at sister launch pads 39B & A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA SLS for Artemis 1 lunar mission at right and SpaceX Falcon 9 for Starlink commercial internet satellite mission at center plus SpaceX Super Heavy Starship launch tower under construction at far left at pad 39A – as seen on September 10, 2022 from Canaveral National Seashore, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

Liftoff of the veteran SpaceX Falcon 9 booster B1058.14 on its record-breaking 14th mission carrying another batch of Starlink internet satellites to LEO was targeted for 9:10 p.m. EDT Saturday evening. Sept. 10 from pad 39A.

 

The Falcon 9 payload on the Starlink 4-2 mission comprised 34 Starlink internet satellites and AST SpaceMobile Blue Walker 3 satellite rideshare.

Two rockets simultaneously vertical at sister launch pads 39B & A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA SLS for Artemis 1 lunar mission at center and SpaceX Falcon 9 for Starlink commercial internet satellite mission at right plus SpaceX Super Heavy Starship launch tower under construction at far leftat pad 39A – as seen on September 10, 2022 from Canaveral National Seashore, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

Engineers were in the process of replacing and repairing seals in the fuel lines leaking hydrogen on the mammoth Artemis 1 Moon rocket out at launch pad 39B which in turn will enable the team to carry out a full tanking demonstration test of super cold cryogenics to verify whether the dangerous leak has been fixed out at the pad under cryogenic conditions, rather than back inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where cryo cooling is not possible – and furthermore set up late September for the next launch attempt from Florida’s Space Coast.

Up Close view of the tail service mast umbilical (TSMU) connected to the base of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on Launch Complex 39B, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center where the hydrogen fuel leak occurred during 2nd launch attempt of the unpiloted Artemis 1 lunar mission on Sept. 3, 2022 that was ultimately scrubbed due to a hydrogen fuel leak. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

Enjoy our photos of the NASA SLS moon rocket and Space Falcon 9 vertical at pads 39B and 39A taken on Saturday, Sept. 10, for Space UpClose team by Ken Kremer offsite on Canaveral National Seashore and Playalinda Beach.

Two rockets simultaneously vertical at sister launch pads 39B & A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA SLS for Artemis 1 lunar mission at right and SpaceX Falcon 9 for Starlink commercial internet satellite mission at left at pad 39A – as seen on September 10, 2022 from Canaveral National Seashore, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

The brief reprise of SLS and Falcon 9 simultaneously vertical follows the first ever such coincidence that took place earlier this year in April when the Falcon 9 hosted the Crew Dragon destined for Axiom-1 – the first all private crewed mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

Two rockets simultaneously vertical at sister launch pads 39B & A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for first time since 2009. NASA SLS for Artemis 1 lunar mission at left and SpaceX Falcon 9 for Axiom-1 mission to ISS at right as seen on April 6, 2022 from Canaveral National Seashore. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

“This is the first time two totally different types of rockets and spacecraft designed to carry humans are on the sister pads at the same time—but it won’t be the last as NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida continues to grow as a multi-user spaceport to launch both government and commercial rockets,” NASA officials announced in April.

Two rockets simultaneously vertical at sister launch pads 39B & A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for first time since 2009. NASA SLS for Artemis 1 lunar mission at left and SpaceX Falcon 9 for Axiom-1 mission to ISS at right as seen on April 6, 2022 from Canaveral National Seashore. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

It was a remarkable feat of coincidence in April when the NASA SLS Mega Moon rocket for the Artemis 1 lunar mission and the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket for the Axiom mission 1 (AX-1) to the ISS were both designed to carry humans to space and both inhabiting adjacent launch pads 39B and 39A for the first time ever – as well as marking the first time since 2009 that both KSC pads were occupied with rockets of any kind.

Our prior photos of the NASA SLS moon rocket and Space Falcon 9 vertical at pads 39B and 39A were taken on Wednesday, April 6 by the Space UpClose team of Ken Kremer and Jean Wright from offsite on Canaveral National Seashore, following a WDR scrub

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket integrated with the Orion spacecraft atop Launch Complex 39B, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center is seen during 2nd launch attempt of the unpiloted Artemis 1 lunar mission on Sept. 3, 2022 that was ultimately scrubbed due to a hydrogen fuel leak. Credit: Jean Wright/spaceupclose.com

Watch Ken’s continuing reports about Artemis, SpaceX missions, SLS, Orion and NASA missions, SpaceX Crew and Cargo Dragons, SpaceX Axiom-1, JWST, IXPE, DART, Lucy Asteroid mission, GOES, SpaceX Starlink, Commercial Crew and Starliner and Crew Dragon, Blue Origin and Space Tourism, and onsite for live reporting of upcoming and recent SpaceX and ULA launches including Crew 1 & 2 & 3 & 4, ISS, Solar Orbiter, Mars 2020 Perseverance and Curiosity rovers, NRO spysats and national security missions and more at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news: www.kenkremer.com –www.spaceupclose.com – twitter @ken_kremer – email: ken at kenkremer.com

Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics.
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Sep 2, 4, 9,10,13  from 7 to 9 PM Quality Inn, Titusville, FL:  Join Ken and Jean for Artemis 1 outreach. ask us anything. plus display our photos and space apparel items for sale

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Ken Kremer and Jean Wright of Space UpClose reporting about NASA’s unpiloted Artemis 1 lunar test flight mission from Launch Complex 39B, at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: Ken Kremer/spaceupclose.com

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Ken Kremer

Watch for Ken’s continuing onsite coverage of NASA, SpaceX, ULA, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and more space and mission reports direct from Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Stay tuned here for Ken's continuing Earth and Planetary science and human spaceflight news. Dr. Kremer is a research scientist and journalist based in the KSC area, active in outreach and interviewed regularly on TV and radio about space topics. Ken’s photos are for sale and he is available for lectures and outreach events.

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